There is Enough: Understanding the Experiences of Life

» Posted by on Apr 18, 2014 in understanding the experiences of life | 0 comments

There is Enough: Understanding the Experiences of Life

Changing our thinking about reality, understanding there is enough, living in the happiness of the present, is the reality that will change our world and those around us.

R. Buckminster (“Bucky”) Fuller stated in the 70’s, that we were able to do so much more with so much less that as a human family we clearly had reached a point where there actually was enough for everyone everywhere to meet or even surpass their needs to live a reasonably healthy, productive life. The challenge, he said, was that all our structures and systems—politics, government, health-care, education, economics, and especially our money system—have been designed around scarcity, around the belief that there was not enough for everyone and that someone would be left out.” —Lynne Twist, The Soul of Money 

Working with a chalkboard, piece of chalk, and one text book took some mental and emotional adjustment, January 2013, at Ingrid Education Centre.

Working with a chalkboard, piece of chalk, and one text book took some mental and emotional adjustment, January 2013, at Ingrid Education Centre.

Thinking about a reasonably healthy, productive life for everyone on the planet kind of contradicts what we see in the world today. In understanding the experiences of life, my grandparents were wheat farmers and produced wheat until the inception of the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), which was:

…signed into law by President Ronald Reagan in 1985. CRP is the largest private-lands conservation program in the United States. Thanks to voluntary participation by farmers and land-owners, CRP has improved water quality, reduced soil erosion, and increased habitat for endangered and threatened species.”

What is CRP and how does it work?

Administered by the Farm Service Agency (FSA), the CRP is a land conservation program in which farmers enrolled in the program receive a yearly rental payment for agreeing to remove environmentally sensitive land from agricultural production and plant species that will improve environmental health and quality. Contracts for land enrolled in CRP are 10-15 years in length; the long-term goal of the program is to re-establish valuable land cover to help improve water quality, prevent soil erosion, and reduce loss of wildlife habitat.”  

Children of Ingrid Education Centre happy to receive books my mother found at a yard sale, October 2012.

Children of Ingrid Education Centre happy to receive books my mother found at a yard sale, October 2012.

Essentially, improving the land became more cost effective than planting and harvesting crops. Granted, my grandparents were farming property that may not have been the most suitable land for producing wheat in the first place (the land typically had an annual rainfall of 7 inches a year), but the CRP program took the guess work out of farming. Bringing this idea to light is not to take sides regarding whether one way or another is right or wrong, good or bad, but to simply point out what is happening behind the scenes in the farming community and how “structures and systems,” as Bucky Fuller said, have played a part in influencing the production or non-production of crops in our country. Reflecting on what Bucky said, Lynne Twist continues in her book,

Speaking to an audience of my peers at Everest College, February 2014.

Speaking to an audience of my peers at Everest College with the use of a Smart Board, February 2014.

“This new threshold completely changes the game, and it would take 50 years, he predicted, for us to make the necessary adjustments in our world so that we could move into a paradigm that says the world can work for everyone with no one and nothing left out. He said that our money system, our financial resources system, would need to adjust itself to reflect the reality and it would take decades for us to make that adjustment, but if and when we did, we would enter an age, a time, and a world in which we treasure that there is enough, steward it wisely, and live in a context of sufficiency and prosperity for all. The very fundamental ways we perceive and think about ourselves and the world we live in would be so transformed that it would be unrecognizable.” —Lynne Twist, The Soul of Money

What does the scripture say about these ideas? Does the Word of God back up the idea that there is enough? What does Ephesians say about sufficiency?

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