Shofar Blowing with the Teachable Spirit

» Posted by on Jul 9, 2017 in teachable spirit | 0 comments

Shofar Blowing with the Teachable Spirit

Why is the sound of the shofar important? What does the sound of the shofar mean? Whose voice is typically connected with the sound of the shofar?

How blessed are the people who know the joyful sound! O LORD, they walk in the light of Your countenance. In Your name they rejoice all the day, And by Your righteousness they are exalted. –Ps. 89:15-16

Blowing my shofar in Kimilili, Kenya, Nov/Dec 2016

Blowing my shofar in Kimilili, Kenya, Nov/Dec 2016

The word translated here in verse 15 as “sound” is the Hebrew transliteration “teruah” used to describe the sound of the shofar. There is no direct translation in English for the word, which is why translators use words such as ‘sound’, ‘shout’, or ‘praise’.

Blowing my shofar that I purchased in Israel in 2007 is a skill I learned from playing the trumpet for 8 years. Everyone in Kenya who heard the sound of the shofar rejoiced to hear it. Below is a video clip where you can observe the members of Grace Tabernacle Church in Nairobi, Kenya worshiping with song and dance while the teachable spirit adds the sound of the shofar.

Rev. Sammy using my shofar as an evangelism tool, Kimilili, Kenya, December 2016.

Rev. Sammy using my shofar as an evangelism tool, Kimilili, Kenya, December 2016.

The sound of the shofar represents all of the following:

  • summon to assemble
  • rally for war
  • announcing the king’s arrival
  • reminding us to return back to God
  • repentance
  • mourning
  • rejoicing and worship
  • the return of our Lord
  • the sound of God’s voice

In Kimilili, Reverend Sammy Ongondo wanted the shofar blown in the middle of the town and the teachable spirit found another use for the sound of the shofar — evangelism.

The sound of the shofar represents God’s voice. When Moses went up on Mt. Sinai to receive the 10 commandments, we read in Exodus 19:18-19:

Blowing my shofar in the Pentecostal Assembly of God in Kericho, Kenya, December 2016.

Blowing my shofar in the Pentecostal Assembly of God church in Kericho, Kenya, December 2016.

Mount Sinai was covered with smoke, because the Lord descended on it in fire. The smoke billowed up from it like smoke from a furnace, and the whole mountain trembled violently. As the sound of the trumpet grew louder and louder, Moses spoke and the voice of God answered him.

Everywhere in scripture that you see the word translated as “trumpet” is actually the word shofar except in Numbers 10:1-10 where God commanded Moses to create silver trumpets for a specific purpose.

Bishop Omesa holding the microphone as I blow my shofar in Kericho, December 2017.

Bishop Omesa holding the microphone as I blow my shofar in Kericho, December 2017.

As believers, we are waiting to hear the sound of God’s voice when He calls us to Him as Paul tells us:

For the Lord Himself will descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel and with the trumpet of God, and the dead in Christ will rise first. — I Thess. 4:16

The teachable spirit loves to hear the sound of the shofar, remembering that blessed are those who hear its sound because they rejoice knowing He is returning soon.

Clip to Evernote


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