Sufficiency with the Teachable Spirit

» Posted by on Mar 25, 2015 in teachable spirit | 0 comments

Sufficiency with the Teachable Spirit

What is the definition of sufficiency? What is enough? How does the teachable spirit acquire this concept?

Sufficiency is the quality of precisely enough, the adequate supply that meets our needs exactly where we are, neither too much nor two little. In her book, The Soul of Money, Lynne Twist describes sufficiency as the place hidden on the inverse side of the three toxic myths prevalent in our world today:

Driving my 1984 El Camino to Ocean Shores,   Washington, April 2014.

Driving my 1984 El Camino to Ocean Shores, Washington, April 2014.

  1. There is not enough.
  2. More is better.
  3. That’s just the way that it is.

Yeshua (Jesus) lived in sufficiency. Some say He was poor; others say that He was wealthy because He was the Son of God. The truth is, He always had exactly enough to do precisely what he needed to do at that moment; never more and never less. When the tax collectors were attempting to collect the temple tax from Peter, Yeshua (Jesus) told him,

“…go to the sea and cast a hook and take the first fish that comes up, and when you open its mouth you will find a shekel. Take that and give it to them for me and for yourself.” –Matthew 17:27

Similarly, when Maharishi Mahesh Yogi was asked, Where will the money come from? He said,

The money will come from wherever it is at the moment.”

Cake pops made by Natalie Van Mechelen on the occasion of Ty's first birthday, November 2014, Port Orchard, Washington.

Appreciating the cake pops made by Natalie Van Mechelen on the occasion of Ty’s first birthday, November 2014, Port Orchard, Washington.

The teachable spirit sees that where scarcity breeds competition, sufficiency breeds collaboration. Wallace Wattles, in his book The Science of Getting Rich, states that collaboration is the key to creating wealth. He goes on to elaborate that while competition may provide riches initially, ultimately, because collaboration is based on sustainability, not consumerism, it will create true wealth, which thoughtfully considers and nourishes the people and environment in the process.

Celebrating Yom Kippur, October 2014, Tacoma, Washington.

Celebrating Yom Kippur, October 2014, Tacoma, Washington.

How can the teachable spirit acquire the concept of sufficiency? In addition to focusing on well-being, Lynne lists the following helpful hints to finding sufficiency in our lives:

  • Get the clutter out of your life
  • Don’t buy something unless you can get rid of something else
  • Practice appreciation for what you already have
  • Learn to value intangible gifts more than tangible gifts
  • Nourish your body instead of feeding it
  • Whenever you spend money, ask yourself, “How it’s going to affect the world?”

The following is a video of Lynne Twist talking about the three toxic myths and sufficiency:

My grandparents homestead and chicken house, October 2014, Kahlotus, Washington.

My place of sufficiency: my grandparents homestead and chicken house, October 2014, Kahlotus, Washington.

Understanding the concept of sufficiency becomes meaningful when the teachable spirit considers the myriad ways in which needs have been met in what seem to be miraculous ways. Living in the space of having exactly enough provides opportunity for collaboration with others that enriches the lives of all who participate in the effort.

True wealth is gained through valuing intangible gifts, nourishing your body as opposed to feeding it, looking beyond the toxic myths that pervade and exacerbate the condition of scarcity, to the joy of precisely, exactly, and sufficiently, enough.

 

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