The Teachable Spirit of Happy Goldilocks

» Posted by on Nov 25, 2015 in teachable spirit | 0 comments

The Teachable Spirit of Happy Goldilocks

Being happy in your spirit has to do with understanding what you need or what you lack before you can ever decide what makes you happy. The teachable spirit knows that experiencing hunger, tiredness, or discomfort is the prerequisite for determining what makes you happy.

Consider Goldilocks for a moment.

Structure on the grounds at Kimana School of Leadership and Professional Studies, Kimana, Kenya, January 2015.

Structure on the grounds at Kimana School of Leadership and Professional Studies, Kimana, Kenya, January 2015.

Finding the house in the forest occurred when she was hungry. Tasting the three bowls of porridge led to observing:

  • one was too hot
  • one was too cold
  • one was just right
Douglas, the founder of Ingrid Education Centre, observing the work of Dr. Jeff Kahrs and Dr. Dave Neubauer, chiropractors that participate in mission trips with Dreamweaver International, Nairobi, Kenya, 2015.

Douglas, the founder of Ingrid Education Centre, observing Dr. Jeff Kahrs and Dr. Dave Neubauer, chiropractors that participate in mission trips with Dreamweaver International, using chairs to adjust the students, Nairobi, Kenya, 2015.

Feeling tired led to seeking which chair would best accommodate her need. She thought that the first two chairs were too big and the third one was just right. Sitting in it; however, caused the chair to break, leading to more discomfort. Climbing the stairs in search of a better solution, she found three beds to choose from:

  • one was too big
  • one was too soft
  • one was just right
Douglas' son, Jeremy, fell asleep on the floor from sheer exhaustion, Nairobi, Kenya, February 2013.

Douglas‘ son, Jeremy, fell asleep on the floor from sheer exhaustion, Nairobi, Kenya, February 2013.

Discovering what made Goldilocks happy apparently tired her out so much that she fell fast asleep… only to be woken up by the owners of the house, porridge, chairs, and beds, who were NOT HAPPY about the invasion of their personal space!

Can you imagine?

  • Why did Goldilocks pass up so many opportunities?
  • Why was Goldilocks such a picky individual?
  • Why did Goldilocks not know what would make her happy and just do it?
Happy Maasai women in Amboseli National Park, Kenya, January 2015.

Happy Maasai women in Amboseli National Park, Kenya, January 2015.

What makes you happy is very unique. Goldilocks was bold enough to explore her environment and figure it out. Sometimes we think that there are multiple ways to be happy, when in fact, THERE IS ONLY ONE! Giving ourselves permission to explore and find out what we like and do not like helps us to arrive at our own personal definition of happy. Sometimes it is a very tiring process, just as it was for Goldilocks, so that ultimately, she had to take a nap!

Girls at Ingrid Education Centre are happy to receive simple pillowcase dresses made by women in the US through Little Dresses for Africa, Nairobi, Kenya, 2015.

Girls from Ingrid Education Centre are happy to receive simple pillowcase dresses made by women in the US through Little Dresses for Africa, Nairobi, Kenya, 2015.

How often do you think that how to live a happy life should automatically be part of your happiness manual? Being happy means understanding what it means to NOT be happy.

This can be hard to take sometimes because somehow the teachable spirit gets the idea that we should be happy all the time. Goldilocks was happy only one-third of the time; two-thirds of the time, she was experiencing unhappiness. Investigating her unhappiness led her to finding out how to live life happy.

Children of Ingrid Education Centre are happy to eat rice mixed with a little bit of cabbage without silverware, Nairobi, Kenya, 2015.

Children of Ingrid Education Centre are happy to eat rice mixed with a little bit of cabbage with their fingers, Nairobi, Kenya, 2015.

In other words, she did not settle for what made Mama Bear and Papa Bear happy; she sussed out her own needs for herself to determine what her personal needs were, and then had the courage to reject those things that would not bring her happiness. Yes, that is right: rejection is part of the process of determining what brings you happiness!

Here then is the issue: to find happiness, we must go through a LOT of unhappiness!

The Maasai children of Amboseli National Park loved the balloons we gave them in Kenya, January 2015.

The Maasai children of Amboseli National Park expressing their happiness for the balloons we gave them in Kenya, January 2015.

And somehow, we find that insufferable. Sorry to disappoint you! You have to determine what makes you unhappy before you can figure out what makes you happy. Part of the problem is identifying our specific needs. We are so busy accepting what other people say we need, and thus “settling” for a “happy life” according to another individual’s idea, that we completely lose our own sense of what we specifically need to live life happy.

Dr. Jeff Kahrs adjusting a baby and her mother on a simple table under at tree in Amboseli National Park, Kenya, January 2015.

Dr. Jeff Kahrs, working with Dreamweaver International, is adjusting a baby and her mother on a simple table under a tree in Amboseli National Park, Kenya, January 2015.

Arriving at happiness is a very precise point–neither too hard nor too soft, too hot nor too cold. Without experiencing those other elements the teachable spirit cannot determine how to be happy. Happiness is efficient and sufficient; it is neither more nor less, abundant or scarce. Arriving at the ingredients you need to create a happy life for yourself means experimenting and saying NO a lot. It means determining what you need, which means being in touch with who you honestly are, and what you really like and do not like.

This little Maasai girl knew exactly what she wanted, at that was to be in the arms of Dr. Jeff Kahrs, Kimana, Kenya, January 2015.

This little Maasai girl knew exactly what she wanted to be happy, and that was to be in the arms of Dr. Jeff Kahrs, Kimana, Kenya, January 2015.

Acquiring a sense of brutal honesty about our tastes means:

  • passing up opportunities
  • saying no to certain activities
  • fine tuning our sense of desire
  • hearing negative feedback when we do things differently

Considering ways to be happy starts with examining exactly what you need, what you require to maintain a happy life, and the willingness to give up those things that are GOOD, but mediocre–in the case of Goldilocks, the chair was good, but it BROKE!

Finding happiness in the traditional food served at Kibo Slopes in Kimana, Kenya, January 2015.

Finding happiness in the traditional food served at Kibo Slopes in Kimana, Kenya, January 2015.

Finding happiness can be taxing as we survey the smorgasbord of choices before us. What makes you happy is specific, precise, and unique to you. Determining how to be happy in life requires complete honesty, which can be elusive with the pressure to conform to the way you have always viewed happiness, the way others view happiness, or the way society typically describes happiness. Giving yourself permission to explore, like Goldilocks did, and having patience as you work through the process, will assist the teachable spirit in arriving at your own definition of happiness, leading automatically and naturally, to a happy spirit.

The teachable spirit desires to return to Kenya in January 2016. Please feel free to support my mission trip by sharing this blog, taking on the challenge of raising money for the campaign, or donating money yourself, as you see fit.

https://www.gofundme.com/jeans2016kenyatrip or

https://www.youcaring.com/jeans2016triptokenya 

Clip to Evernote


Not currently getting Jean’s newsletter, full of spiritual and inspirational insight, tools and modern day translations?  Get it now!

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Google+