Understanding the Experiences of Life with Caldula

» Posted by on Jun 2, 2014 in understanding the experiences of life | 0 comments

Understanding the Experiences of Life with Caldula

What is it like to provide medical care to individuals in the Kimana Rift Valley?
What kind of people need services and what kind of services are needed?

Understanding the experiences of life has taught me that we take medical care very seriously here in the U.S. whereas people in other countries do not give much thought about it because they generally do not have the resources to be concerned. However, there sometimes comes a moment in an individual’s life where medical care and attention is needed beyond available resources. What happens in that case? Dr. Warren Bruhl tells the story of Caldula, an 85 year old woman that he and Dr. Scott Smith had the opportunity to attend to after she suffered a hip fracture. Here is the story in his own words:

Dr. Scott Smith creating a  stabilization brace for Caldula, December 2013.

Dr. Scott Smith creating a stabilization brace for Caldula, December 2013.

Caldula is one of the strongest ladies I have ever met.  Prior to our visit to her boma, she had suffered a medially displaced left hip fracture and had been driven by motorcycle 1 and 1/2 hours to a public hospital which had no medicine to provide for pain and no way to help.  Fearing death in the hospital she checked herself out and asked her family to pick her up via motorcycle again.  She laid in bed for one week in a 95 degree darkened room that was no bigger than seven x seven and all she wanted to do was see the light of day and her grandchildren.  We provided care, setting the fracture and also bracing made of PVC pipe, so her leg could be stabilized and she was able to get outside. This is a remarkable story, which we have also captured on video.

Manual manipulation through chiropractic care offers an opportunity to such a woman as Caldula to improve the quality of her life without exorbitant medical fees and elaborate care. As Dr. Warren Bruhl states in the video, in the U.S., this situation would have been handled differently; however, here in the bush, the most appropriate method is to use something that does not require heroic effort and gets the job done. In the end, Caldula just wanted

Dr. Warren Bruhl holds the light inside the darkened home of Caldula, December 2013.

Dr. Warren Bruhl holds the light inside the darkened home of Caldula, December 2013.

to be comfortable, free of pain, near her family, and breathing fresh air. Working together, Dr. Warren Bruhl and Dr. Scott Smith were able to provide exactly what she needed.

Medical attention in the bush is:

  • simple
  • compassionate
  • using what you have on hand and making it work
  • addressing basic needs
Directors of KMH: Ken and Sandy Taylor, Dr. Scott Smith, and Dr. Warren Bruhl, August 2013.

Directors of KMH: Ken and Sandy Taylor, Dr. Scott Smith, and Dr. Warren Bruhl, August 2013.

The Kilimanjaro Mission Hospital (KMH) seeks to do exactly these things, providing the care that is needed for individuals that live in the Kimana Rift Valley, serving patients for 250 square miles and more than half a million people who do not have access to proper medical care.

For further information on how you can make an incredible impact on the Maasai in the Kimana Rift Valley of Kenya by contributing to the Mount Kilimanjaro Mission Hospital, contact Dr. Warren Bruhl via email: dr.bruhl@dreamweaver911.org or other members of  the Board through Dreamweaver International.

Clip to Evernote


Not currently getting Jean’s newsletter, full of spiritual and inspirational insight, tools and modern day translations?  Get it now!

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Google+